Past Exhibitions

CUE: ARTISTS' VIDEOS

January 23 to March 21, 2010

CUE Publication



Guido Van Der Werve
Nummer acht: Everything is going
to be alright
[production still], 2007
16 mm film transferred to HD
Courtesy of Monitor Gallery, Rome;
Gallery Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam;
Marc Foxx, Los Angeles
Photo: Ben Geraerts

PRESENTED WITH:

VANOCCOV








SUPPORTING SPONSOR:

Panasonic



ADDITIONAL FUNDING FROM:

BCAC



The Vancouver Art Gallery presents CUE: Artists’ Videos, an exhibition of video art displayed on the portico of the Robson Street facade. In transforming its exterior into a freely accessible, open-air exhibition space, the Gallery has created an opportunity for the public to experience contemporary experimental film and video in new ways. More than seventy artists contribute to this exciting international program, reinforcing Vancouver’s prominence as a major centre for contemporary art by bringing the best of the world to Vancouver and presenting the best of Vancouver for the world to see.

More than eighty titles from countries spanning the globe have been selected and arranged into seven thematic programs. Included are works that address cinematic language in video, utilize performances made specifically for the camera, or witness the unfolding of world events. Others speak to everyday occurrences, highlight music and sound, or examine the age of spectacle in which we live. Each program runs continuously on selected days between 5:00 A.M. and 2:00 A.M.

Video now occupies a central position in contemporary art and CUE offers audiences the occasion to explore relationships in subject matter, formal innovation and technique that define current video and film practices. Selections are based on videos that lend themselves to exterior display in a public space and range from short, dynamic works that will surprise and delight, to those that deeply probe the complexities of today’s world.

CUE: Artists’ Videos is organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and co-curated by Daina Augaitis, Chief Curator/Associate Director, and Christopher Eamon, New York.

JANUARY
MON


TUE


WED


THUR


FRI


SAT


SUN

21
THE MIX

22
THE MIX

23
THE MIX

24
THE MIX

25
Sight and Sound

26
Notes on the Everyday

27
History in the Making

28
Living in the Spectacle

29
Borrowing from Cinema

30
Performing for the Camera

31
Constructing Tableaux


FEBRUARY
MON


TUE


WED


THUR


FRI


SAT


SUN

1
Notes on the Everyday

2
Performing for the Camera

3
History in the Making

4
Borrowing from the Cinema

5
THE MIX

6
Sight and Sound

7
Notes on the Everyday

8
History in the Making

9
Living in the Spectacle

10
Borrowing from the Cinema

11
Performing for the Camera

12
Constructing Tableaux

13
Living in the Spectacle

14
THE MIX

15
Performing for the Camera

16
Notes on the Everyday

17
Sight and Sound

18
Constructing Tableaux

19
Living in the Spectacle

20
Borrowing from the Cinema

21
Performing for the Camera

22
Sight and Sound

23
Borrowing from the Cinema

24
Living in the Spectacle

25
History in the Making

26
Notes on the Everyday

27
Constructing Tableaux

28
Sight and Sound


MARCH
MON


TUE


WED


THUR


FRI


SAT


SUN

1
Living in the Spectacle

2
History in the Making

3
Performing for the Camera

4
Notes on the Everyday

5
Constructing Tableaux

6
Borrowing from the Cinema

7
Living in the Spectacle

8
Performing for the Camera

9
Sight and Sound

10
Borrowing from the Cinema

11
Constructing Tableaux

12
History in the Making

13
Performing for the Camera

14
Borrowing from the Cinema

15
Notes on the Everyday

16
Constructing Tableaux

17
Living in the Spectacle

18
Sight and Sound

19
THE MIX

20
THE MIX

21
THE MIX


CUE: ARTIST'S VIDEOS PROGRAM

BORROWING FROM CINEMA
This program includes works that refer to the well-known aesthetic and narrative strategies of mainstream cinema. Increasingly since the 1990s, many video artists have adopted the conventions of Hollywood cinema by using cast and crew, sets, and high-end post-production, creating works of art that self-consciously comment on, and often critique, this dominant form.

Pascal Grandmaison, Neutrality Escape, 2008, 11'24"
Christian Marclay, Telephones, 1995, 7'30"
Bill Morrison, Light is Calling, 2004, 8'
Marcel Dzama, The Lotus Eaters Trailer, 2005-2007, 1'22"
Patrick Bernatchez, I Feel Cold Today, 2006-2007, 13'28"
Mark Lewis, Algonquin Park, September, 2001, 2'43"
Josh Azzarella, Untitled #100 (Fantasia), 2007-2009, 12'06"
Yang Fudong, Lock Again, 2004, 3'
Steve McQueen, Deadpan, 1997, 4'30"
Christoph Girardet and Matthias Müller, Play, 2003, 7'20"


CONSTRUCTING TABLEAUX
Since their inception, photography and (more recently) new media such as video have maintained a dialogue with the established traditions of painting. The grouping of works in this program makes palpable the interplay with traditional forms by creating what appear as still “pictures” and by referencing an early definition of “tableaux” where figures are arranged in space. This type of construction of “pictures” in video also alludes to the active and process-oriented nature of video art today.

Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Der Lauf der Dinge (The Way Things Go), 1987, 30'
David Hoffos, Disaster, 2000, 3'09"
Mark Wallinger, On An Operating Table, 1998, 13'
Adad Hannah, Eros and Aphrodite, 2008, 7'18"
Elisabetta Benassi, Io non ho mani che mi accarezzino il volto, 2004, 1'31"
Adad Hannah, Repose (on the Plinthe), 2008, 4'33"
Gwenaël Bélanger, Chutes, 2002-2005, 3'30"
Alex Hubbard, Cinépolis, 2007, 1'55"
Elisabetta Benassi, Suolo, 2007, 14'50"
Marina Roy, Apartment, 2008, 10'11" excerpt
Matthias Müller, Pictures, 2002, 5'25" excerpt
Julie Andreyev, Screentest – Sugi, 2009, 4'05"
Paulette Phillips, Crosstalk, 2004, 4'20"
     

NOTES ON THE EVERYDAY
The notion of the “everyday” has become ever more prominent in art-making since the post-war period, as traditional media such as easel painting and sculpture were increasingly seen as incapable of communicating the experience of modern life. Today it is widely accepted that the quotidian can be the subject and substance of art, and the videos in this program reconsider the humble—and often banal—objects and activities of our day-to-day existence.

Nelson Henricks, Countdown, 2007, 0'30"
Myfanwy MacLeod, The Greeter, 2000, 7' excerpt
Euan Macdonald, Hammock Sleep, 2001, 2' excerpt
Thomas Mulcaire, Study for Solaris, 2007, 6'39"
Seifollah Samadian, The White Station, 1999, 9'
Julie Andreyev, Bikeride, 2009, 4'47"
Carol Sawyer, Water Park, 3'19"
Damián Ortega, Ejercicio de lectura, 2002, 3'40"
Jennifer Steinkamp, Orbit 2, 2008, 3'30" excerpt
Ciprian Mure?an, 4'33", 2008, 4'33"
Yael Bartana, Kings of the Hill, 2003, 7'45"
Mircea Cantor, Deeparture, 2005, 7'29" excerpt
Hiraki Sawa, Dwelling, 2002, 9'20"
Paul Wong, Last Year, 2010, 6'23"
Gary Hill, Attention, 2005, 4' excerpt
Frédéric Lavoie, Code D’accès, 2003, 2'
Michael Snow, Condensation: A Cove Story, 2009, 10'
Roy Arden, Juggernaut, 2000, 3'
David Shrigley, Light Switch, 2007, 1'29"


SIGHT AND SOUND
The importance of sound in much video art is often disregarded in the face of the seductive power of the visual. In music videos, the relationship between image and sound is inverted, and the audio track or score becomes the starting point for the work. This program looks to videos that foreground sound as an essential, if not the most significant, component of the piece.

Dara Birnbaum, Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman, 1978-1979, 5'50"
Christian Marclay, Record Players, 1983-1984, 5'
Oliver Laric, Aircondition, 2006, 1'59"
Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay, Live to Tell, 2002, 5'
Jordan Wolfson, Untitled False Document/Ambien/Scorpio/Aspargas/Infra Red, 2007-2009, 3'31"
Su-Mei Tse, L’echo, 2003, 4'54" excerpt
Frédéric Lavoie, Dernier Mouvement, 2008, 6'20"
Johanna Billing, Magical World, 2005, 6'12"
Björn Perborg and Claudia del Fierro, Árboles, 2008, 5'01"
Gillian Wearing, Dancing in Peckham, 1994, 25'
Jeremy Shaw, Morning Has Broken, 2001, 3'39"


HISTORY IN THE MAKING
We might presume that the writing of history focuses on significant acts or events, yet narrating the past also shares with art- and myth-making a reliance on seemingly small or insignificant moments. Analogue tape, filmstrips and Ektachrome slides all evoke the having-been-there quality of a photograph, and lend themselves to use in the mini-histories that are the focus of this program. Even the ancient arts of calligraphy and ink drawing can be reanimated by stop-frame techniques to recount incidents that will become tomorrow’s histories.

Qiu Anxiong, Minguo Landscape, 2006-2007, 14'33"
Barbara Hlali, Painting Paradise, 2008, 5'30"
Dana Claxton, Anwolek – Regatta City, 2005, 4'35"
Lida Abdul, In Transit, 2008, 4'
Zhenchen Liu, Shanghai, Shanghai, 2006, 11'37"
Chen Chieh-jen, Factory, 2003, 31'09"
William Kentridge, Tide Table, 2003, 8'
Darren Almond, A, 2002, 22'
David Shrigley, New Friends, 2006, 1'


PERFORMING FOR THE CAMERA
The camera can be said to provoke acts of performance. “Performance art” was a new and relatively radical practice in the 1970s and 1980s, and has since become a prominent aspect of contemporary art. Several works in this program continue to explore the early tradition of taking the artist’s own actions as subject matter, while others re-enact and extend ideas about performance through a variety of approaches and techniques.

David Shrigley, The Flame, 2008, 1'11"
Jon Sasaki, Fireworks, 2006, 2'06"
Chris Larson, Deep North, 2008, 5'59"
Tim Lee, Untitled (Studio Roll, 1970), 2009, 1'01"
Jin-me Yoon, As It Is Becoming (Seoul, Korea): Teum/Passages Through, 2008, 9’27"
Guido van der Werve, Nummer Acht: Everything Is Going To Be Alright, 2007, 10'10"
Kimsooja, A Needle Woman – Kitakyushu, 1999, 6'33"
Deirdre Logue, excerpts from Enlightened Nonsense [“Patch,” 2000; “H2Oh Oh,” 2000; “Moohead,” 1999; “Always a Bridesmaid...Never a Bride of Frankenstein,” 2000; “Milk and Cream,” 2000; “Fall,” 1997], 9'40"
Robin Rhode, Paper Planes, 2009, 2'40"
Jun Nguyen-Hatsushiba, Happy New Year: Memorial Project Vietnam II, 2003, 15'
Kathy Slade, Tugboat, 2007, 5'
Mads Lynnerup, Hat, 2000, 0'45"
Isaac Julien, Vagabondia, 2000, 7'
Gonzalo Lebrija, Asterión, 2006, 4'11"
Maïder Fortuné, Totem, 2001, 10'
Paulette Phillips, “It's about how people judge appearance,” 2001, 1'


LIVING IN THE SPECTACLE
We live, it has been argued, in a society of the spectacle. The massive accumulation of images encountered in daily life threatens to eclipse the possibility of directly lived relationships. Many works in this program borrow techniques from and celebrate the spectacular—this enormous outdoor video screen being one of them—while others implicitly question the ability to manipulate individuals with a constant bombardment of images and information.

Grazia Toderi, Rosso, 2007, 3'05" excerpt
Marco Brambilla, Civilization, 2008, 6'40" excerpt
Cao Fei, The Birth of RMB City, 2009, 10'32"
Thomas Bayrle, B)alt, 1997, 4'
Thomas Bayrle, Gummibaum, 1993-1994, 8'08"
Grazia Toderi, Semper eadem, 2004, 3'54"
Christine Davis, Satellite Ballet (for Loïe Fuller) 2008-2009, 0'18"
Grazia Toderi, Il Decollo, 1998, 2'20"
Kota Ezawa, Brawl, 2008, 4'
Janek Simon, Jump, 2006, 10' excerpt
Bjørn Melhus, Happy Rebirth, 2004, 1'30"
Robert Arndt, Trailer, 2006, 2'06"