Current Exhibitions

Lawren Harris
Canadian Visionary

March 1 to May 4, 2014

Lawren Harris: Canadian Visionary
Watch now: an insightful introduction by Ian Thom, Senior Curator-Historical.



Lawren Harris
Mount Thule, Bylot Island, 1930
oil on canvas
Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery
Gift of the Vancouver Art Gallery Women's Auxiliary
Photo by Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery



Lawren Harris
Tamarack Swamp, Algoma, 1920
oil on canvas
Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery
Photo by Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery



Lectures & Talks
Tues, Apr 1, 7pm | Talk
Sat, Apr 5, 3pm | Curator's Tour

Videos
Lawren Harris: Canadian Visionary
Watch now: A special tumblr site on Lawren Harris' drawings



Lawren Harris Tumblr Page

Visit the Lawren Harris tumblr page for further information about the artist's drawings.
Please click here or the image.
Lawren Harris: CanadIan Visionary is a career survey of Group of Seven founding member Lawren Stewart Harris, who played a major role in the history of painting in Canada. Presenting an extensive selection of work from the Gallery's permanent collection as well as select loans from local and national collections, the exhibition traces Harris' artistic evolution from the early years of the twentieth century to the mid-1960s and illustrates his move from representational art to abstraction.

Among many groundbreaking works in the exhibition is Tamarack Swamp, Algoma (1920), one of the most important landscape paintings in the Gallery's permanent collection. Personally donated to the Gallery by Harris' daughter Margaret H. Knox, this painting exemplifies how Harris turned a subject that was considered unattractive into a beautiful work of art. One of Harris' sketchbooks is also on view for the first time, reflecting on his transition to a non-representational expression of the spiritual. A Tumblr site is dedicated to sketches that have yet to be paired with their corresponding paintings, and audiences worldwide are invited to share their suggestions and comments.

In 1920, Harris joined six colleagues to form the Group of Seven, which remains one of the most influential art movements in Canadian history and which redefined not only the perception of this country's landscape but also what was appropriate subject matter for its painters. After the dissolution of the Group in 1933, Harris moved toward abstraction and in 1940 he relocated to Vancouver, where he remained until his death in 1970. During these later years he became a major figure in the community and an important leader in the life of the Vancouver Art Gallery, in particular encouraging the development of its Emily Carr Trust collection.

Organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and curated by Ian Thom, Senior Curator-Historical.


Generously Supported by:
Stephanie A. Carlson