The Audain Prize for Lifetime
Achievement in the Visual Arts

About the Awards

Established in 2004, The Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts has become one of Canada’s most prestigious honours. Supported by The Audain Foundation, the Audain Prize grants $30,000 annually to a senior British Columbia artist selected by an independent jury.

Audain Award Winners  2004-2016
2017 CAROLE ITTER  |  2016 PAUL WONG  |  2015 MICHAEL MORRIS  |  2014 FRED HERZOG  |  2013 TAKAO TANABE and GATHIE FALK  |  2012 MARIAN PENNER BANCROFT  |  2011 RODNEY GRAHAM  |  2010 ROBERT DAVIDSON  |  2009 LIZ MAGOR  |  2008 JEFF WALL  |  2007 GORDON SMITH  |  2006 ERIC METCALFE  |  2005 E.J. HUGHES  |  2004 ANN KIPLING

EVENTS



APR 19
WED, 7pm
The Great Hall
Law Courts Building
800 Smithe Street
Directions »
The Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts + VIVA Award + The Alvin Balkind Curator’s Prize
The Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts
The Audain Foundation, the Jack and Doris Shadbolt Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Vancouver Art Gallery cordially invite you to attend the 2017 awards ceremony to congratulate the recipients of the Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts + VIVA Award + the Alvin Balkind Curator’s Prize. Congratulations to award recipients Carole Itter, Lyse Lemieux and Grant Arnold!

Presentations followed by reception. Free entrance.

2017

Audain Awards
Carole Itter, Grand Piano Rattle: a Bosendorfer for Al Neil, 1984
metal, paint, wood, light fixture
Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Acquisition Fund
Photo: Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery

Carole Itter


2017 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

An interdisciplinary artist, writer, performer and filmmaker and this year’s Audain Prize recipient, Carole Itter was born in Vancouver in 1939 and studied at the University of British Columbia, the Vancouver School of Art and at L’Accademia di Belle Arti in Rome, Italy. Her sculptures, collages and performances, as well as the large-scale assemblages/installations which she is probably best known for, are strongly influenced by the people and places where she has lived and frequently reflect social and political issues. Over the many years she has lived in Vancouver’s Strathcona neighbourhood, Itter has incorporated discarded domestic and industrial items found in attics and basements, lanes and thrift shops, and received objects from friends into her assemblages. These assemblages, such as the one featured in Paved with Gold: A Tribute to a Canadian Immigrant Neighbourhood (Vancouver Art Gallery, 1991), have also addressed issues of historical and contemporary immigration to Canada. She has also produced a number of short stories and prose pieces, including Whistle Daughter Whistle and The Log’s Log. Itter’s work is included in the collections of The Canada Council Art Bank, the Vancouver Public Library and the Vancouver Art Gallery.

2016


Watch now: Interview with Paul Wong: Recipient of the 2016 Audain Prize.


Audain Awards
Paul Wong, Solstice, 2014, video installation, Photo: SD Holman

Paul Wong


2016 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Born in Prince Rupert, British Columbia, in 1954, Paul Wong is an award-winning artist and curator known for pioneering early visual and media art in Canada, founding several artist-run groups, leading public arts policy and organizing events, festivals, conferences and public interventions since the 1970s. He has shown and produced projects throughout North America, Europe and Asia. In 2005, Paul Wong received Canada’s Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Art for outstanding contributions to the field. Wong’s works are in many public collections including those of the National Gallery of Canada, the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Canada Council Art Bank (Ottawa), and the Vancouver Art Gallery. He is in numerous private collections and is the recipient of several major commissions and grants.

2015

Michael Morris
Michael Morris, The Problem of Nothing, 1966, acrylic on canvas, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver Centennial Award Purchase Prize, VAG 66.19, Photo: Robert Keziere, Vancouver Art Gallery

Michael Morris


2015 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Michael Morris is a highly acclaimed painter, photographer, video and performance artist, and curator. His work is often media-based and collaborative. He has been a key figure of the West Coast art scene since the 1960s. Together with Vincent Trasov, he founded Image Bank–a platform for personal exchange between artists in 1969. In 1973, Morris co-founded the Western Front Society–one of Canada’s first artist-run centres–and served as co-director of the Front for seven years. In 1981, he was invited with Trasov to Berlin as guests of the Berliner Künstlerprogramm DAAD. He and Trasov founded the Morris/Trasov Archive in 1990, currently housed at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Morris’ work is represented in private and public collections nationally and internationally, and he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities in 2005 by Emily Carr University of Art + Design. He currently lives and works in Victoria, British Columbia.

2014

Fred Herzog
Fred Herzog, Untitled [Hastings and Columbia Street, Vancouver], 1958, chromogenic print, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Purchased with the financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Assistance Program and the Vancouver Art Gallery Acquisition Fund, VAG 2005.13.3

Fred Herzog


2014 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

The 2014 Audain Prize honouree, Fred Herzog, has been active in Vancouver's art scene for almost fifty years. Born in Germany in 1930, he immigrated to Canada in 1952. Herzog began making colour photographs of Vancouver using Kodachrome slide film in 1953, and has continued to document this city and other locations he has encountered in his extensive travels ever since. Herzog was employed as a medical photographer, first at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, then with the Department of Biomedical Communications at the University of British Columbia. He also taught photography at Simon Fraser University (1967-1969) and at the University of British Columbia (1969-1974). His students included Theodore Wan and Christos Dikeakos, who would later become widely recognized for their photographic work. His activities as an artist and teacher play an important role in discussions of photography in Vancouver to this day. A major retrospective of his work was presented at the Vancouver Art Gallery in 2007. His work is in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; and Vancouver Art Gallery.

2013

Takao Tanabe
Takao Tanabe, Untitled (Passing Rainbow), 1968, acrylic on canvas, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of J. Ron Longstaffe, VAG 82.84, Photo: Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery

Takao Tanabe


2013 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Takao Tanabe is a distinguished artist whose work has been exhibited internationally, as well as featured in solo and group exhibitions throughout Canada. He is a Member of the Order of Canada, the Order of British Columbia and recipient of the Governor General’s Award in Visual Arts. Born in Prince Rupert, BC, Tanabe attended the Winnipeg School of Art, the Brooklyn Museum Art School and the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London. He also studied with Hans Hoffman in New York and Isao Hirayama at the Tokyo University of Fine Arts. While he was head of the Art Department at the Banff School of Fine Arts between 1973 and 1980, Tanabe began to paint the landscapes for which he is best known. His evocative landscape paintings are represented in over 50 public collections in Canada and 120 corporate collections internationally.

Gathie Falk
Gathie Falk, Home Environment, 1968, ceramic, acrylic paint, polyester resin, metal, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of Douglas Chrismas, Vancouver, VAG 70.109 a-c

Gathie Falk


2013 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Gathie Falk is a highly acclaimed artist whose work has been exhibited nationally and is held in numerous collections, including at the Vancouver Art Gallery and the National Gallery of Canada. A recipient of the Order of Canada, the Order of British Columbia and the Governor General’s Award in Visual Arts, Falk is best known as a painter, sculptor and performance artist whose work reflects the objects and activities of everyday life. Born in Alexander, Manitoba, she moved to Vancouver and worked as an elementary school teacher while undertaking formal art training at the University of British Columbia. In 1962, she began exhibiting her paintings in group shows and, in 1965, had her first solo exhibition in Vancouver. In the late 1960s, Falk began to focus on making innovations in ceramic sculpture and performance art, and continues to be prolific in her studio to this day.

2012

Marian Penner Bancroft
Marian Penner Bancroft, Mnemonicon (The Screen), 1988, silver gelatin print on panel, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of the Artist, VAG 2013.12.1, Photo: Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery

Marian Penner Bancroft


2012 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Based in Vancouver, Marian Penner Bancroft’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is held in numerous collections, including those of the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography in Ottawa. Her work investigates the intersections of the photographic image with history, music and mapping strategies in relation to representations of landscape. Best-known for her photography, her work also extends to art involving text, sound, video, drawing and sculpture. Penner Bancroft studied at the University of British Columbia, the Vancouver School of Art (now ECUAD) and Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in Toronto. In addition to her art practice, she teaches at Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

2011

Rodney Graham
Rodney Graham, Artist's Model Posing for "The Old Bugler, Among the Fallen, Battle of Beaune-la-Roland 1870" in the Studio of an Unknown Military Painter, Paris 1885, 2009, chromogenic transparency, lightbox, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of BMO Financial Group, VAG 2011.6.1 a-c

Rodney Graham


2011 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Based in Vancouver, Rodney Graham has been internationally recognized as one of the most original artists of his generation. Drawing upon diverse sources that range from Lewis Carroll and Sigmund Freud to Kurt Cobain, Graham synthesizes conceptual rigour and humour to produce art that is both captivating and paradoxical. Graham’s work is in the permanent collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery and was featured in the 2005 exhibition Rodney Graham: A Little Thought, which toured internationally. His photo-based works can be found in a number of public collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Centre Georges Pompidou, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Solo exhibitions include a retrospective in 2004-05 that toured North American venues as well as a European touring exhibition in 2002. He has participated in landmark exhibitions, representing Canada at the Venice Biennale in 1997, and exhibiting at Documenta IX in 1992 and at Sculpture Project Muenster in 1987.

2010

Robert Davidson
Robert Davidson, Before the Snag, 1997, screenprint on paper, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of the Artist, VAG 2011.27.4, Photo: Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery

Robert Davidson


2010 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Robert Davidson is renowned as one Canada’s most distinguished contemporary artists for his work as a master carver, printmaker, painter and jeweler. An artist of Haida descent, Davidson has gained prominence for the creative development of his nation’s traditional art forms. Having mastered the bold formline designs of classical Haida art over the past 30 years, Davidson now pushes the boundaries of the tradition to realize new and exciting levels. A leading figure in the renaissance of Haida art and culture, Davidson carved the first totem pole to be raised this century in Massett, Haida Gwaii in 1969—a catalyst for the flood of creative activity that has emanated from this community. Davidson’s exquisitely crafted work is held in public collections from the National Gallery of Canada to the Vancouver Art Gallery, which recently commissioned the artist to carve the large-scale transformation panel, Killer Whale Transforming into a Thunderbird, which was recently displayed in the exhibition Visions of British Columbia: A Landscape Manual. The winner of the 2010 Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts, Davidson lives and works in White Rock, British Columbia.

2009

Liz Magor

Liz Magor


2009 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Born in 1948, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Liz Magor studied at the University of British Columbia and the Parsons School of Design, New York. Since her first solo exhibition in 1977, Magor has established an international reputation, representing Canada at the Venice Biennale in 1984 and Documenta VIII in Kassel, Germany in 1987. Her work has been exhibited extensively throughout Canada, including exhibitions at the Vancouver Art Gallery, National Gallery of Canada and Art Gallery of Ontario. In 2001, she received the Governor General’s Award for Visual Arts. The artist lives in Vancouver and teaches at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

2008

Jeff Wall
Jeff Wall, War game, 2007, silver gelatin print, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Purchased with funds from the Audain Foundation, Vancouver Art Gallery Acquisition Fund and Major Purchase Fund, VAG 2007.36.1

Jeff Wall


2008 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Jeff Wall is widely acknowledged as one of the world’s most influential contemporary artists. Over the past two decades he has developed a body of work that has played an important role in establishing photography as the most significant art form of the late 20th century. His work has been exhibited in galleries and art museums throughout the world, including solo exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Art Institute of Chicago, Art Tower Mito, Japan, Museo Nacional and Tate Modern, London. With a recent acquisition purchased in part with funding provided by the Audain Foundation, the Vancouver Art Gallery became the largest public holder of Wall’s work in North America.

2007

Gordon Smith
Gordon Smith, Pachino 43, 1993, acrylic on tarpaulin, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of Leon and Joan Tuey, VAG 97.71

Gordon Smith


2007 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Over the course of his more than 60-year painting career, Gordon Smith has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions, from the 1957 Guggenheim International Exhibition, to the 1975 touring exhibition Canadian Canvas, to 2011’s Shore, Forest and Beyond: Art from the Audain Collection at the Vancouver Art Gallery. A key figure in the history of Modernist painting in Vancouver and Canada, Smith continues to work in his West Vancouver studio every day where he explores the relationships between abstraction and representation and to hold regular solo exhibitions. Smith is the recipient of the Order of Canada (1996), the Order of BC (2000) and the Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts (2009), and his work is held in private and public collections around the word.

2006

Eric Metcalfe
Eric Metcalfe, Howard Hughes Inc., 1977, screenprint on paper, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of Maryon and Jack Adelaar, VAG 2001.43.4, Photo: Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery

Eric Metcalfe


2006 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Born in Vancouver and raised in Victoria, British Columbia, Eric Metcalfe was exposed to art, dance, painting and jazz at an early age, leading him to pursue an education in art at the University of Victoria (1970). In the late 1960s, he became involved in the Conceptual Art, Mail Art and Fluxus movements, working alongside artists such as Hank Bull, Michael Morris, Vincent Trasov and Kate Craig (whom he married and collaborated with as Lady and Dr. Brute). Metcalfe’s practice encompasses many disciplines, including painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, performance, video and film. In 1973, along with seven other Vancouver-area artists, Metcalfe co-founded the Western Front, one of the first artist-run centres in both Vancouver and Canada. He received the Governor General’s Award in Visual Arts in 2008. Metcalfe continues to live and work in Vancouver.

2005

E.J. Hughes
E.J. Hughes, The Artist in his Studio, 1956–57, oil on canvas, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Acquisition Fund, VAG 92.61, Photo: Teresa Healy, Vancouver Art Gallery

E.J. Hughes


2005 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

North Vancouver–born painter E.J. Hughes (1913–2007) is best known for his colourful, simplified and perspectivally flattened depictions of the landscape and seascape of British Columbia. A graduate of the Vancouver School of Applied Art and Design (1935), Hughes was trained by Charles H. Scott, Frederick Varley and Jock MacDonald before going on to work as a commercial artist, including as a drypoint painter and a muralist. Following service as an official war artist during the Second World War, Hughes returned to British Columbia to live with his wife, Fern, on Vancouver Island. Recognition of his distinctive painting style grew throughout the 1950s, and he was represented by Dominion Gallery, Montreal, for more than 35 years. Hughes was the inaugural recipient of the Emily Carr Scholarship (1951) and was awarded both the Order of BC (2005) and the Order of Canada (2001). His work is held in collections across Canada.

2004

Ann Kipling
Ann Kipling, Manfried Quandt, 1988, pastel, conté on paper, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Gift of the Artist, VAG 98.40.2, Photo: Trevor Mills, Vancouver Art Gallery

Ann Kipling


2004 Audain Prize for Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts

Ann Kipling was born in Victoria, British Columbia, in 1934. She began attending the Vancouver School of Art in 1955 and graduated with honours in 1960. In the early part of her career she studied with Jan Zach and Herbert Seibner in Victoria. She also attended the Instituto Allende in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Working exclusively on paper, Kipling has established herself as an important figure in Canadian art. Her work can be found in public and private collections across the country. Kipling states: “Drawing is exploratory. It defines and clarifies a visual idea. It is also the delight in mark making, the magical connection between things seen and described, the direct encounter. When I am drawing from the figure or in the landscape, I am fascinated by the change, movement, energy, and transformation of form in a seemingly static situation.”